Cardiovascular

Bayer at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 66th Annual Scientific Session

From 17-19 March 2017, the world’s leading cardiovascular professionals will gather for the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 66th Annual Scientific Session in Washington DC to share, educate, debate and discuss hot topics in the field of cardiology. Over the course of the weekend, more than 200 sessions will cover a wide range of topics that aim to inform delegates of the latest clinical data supporting everyday clinical practice, and offer attendees the opportunity to network with their peers and learn from experts in the field.

At Bayer we are proud to support an unprecedented clinical study programme in an important area of cardiology – blood clot management. Our investment in this field not only highlights our commitment to supporting physicians and patients, but also our dedication to addressing areas of unmet medical need to achieve the best possible outcomes for a range of patients across multiple disease areas.

At this year’s ACC.17, Bayer is presenting the latest clinical and real-world evidence in blood clot management in 10 late-breaking oral and poster presentations.

Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer
Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer

“I was delighted to attend ACC.17 this year where Bayer presented exciting new clinical data that we hope will help to address important questions in blood clot management, specifically around the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism.”

Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer


Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada
Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada

“I am excited to have had the opportunity to present new, late-breaking data at ACC.17 that provide physicians with insights into the benefit-risk balance of potential new treatment options for patients who are at risk of a recurrent venous thromboembolism.”

Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada


Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada
Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada

“It was great to follow the presentations at this year’s ACC.17, particularly those that discussed additional treatment regimens. If approved, that could give physicians the flexibility to select the most appropriate extended treatment approach for patients at risk of recurrent VTE, based on individual patient characteristics.”

Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada


Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer
Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer

“Bayer’s presence at ACC.17, and the new data presented, demonstrates our continued commitment to improving patients’ lives by supporting extensive ongoing clinical programmes within the cardiology field.”

Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer


Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer
Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer

“Anticoagulants have been approved for use in a broad range of patients for many years now, yet there are still important clinical questions that need to be addressed. At this year’s ACC.17, Bayer is presenting some exciting new data that could help to address some of these areas of unmet medical need and I personally am proud to be part of the team at Bayer who is dedicated to improving outcomes for patients.”

Dr Frank Misselwitz, Vice President and Head Therapeutic Areas Thrombosis & Hematology, Bayer


Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada
Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada

“Venous thromboembolism, or VTE, comprising pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis, is a common, potentially fatal condition, and one of the three leading causes of cardiovascular death, along with stroke and heart attack. Available treatment options are effective and well tolerated, but the key question for physicians is for how long anticoagulation therapy should be given. Guidelines e.g. from the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) recommend anticoagulation therapy for three months or longer following an initial VTE, as the risk of a second event is up to 10 percent in the first year once treatment is stopped. ACC.17 provides the cardiology community with an important platform at which to discuss latest insights from this very important and, for me personally, very exciting area of clinical research.”

Professor Philip Wells, Chair and Chief of the Department of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada


Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada
Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada

“In daily clinical practice, physicians need to carefully balance patients’ risk of a recurrent VTE with their risk of bleeding. As a result, many physicians are reluctant to continue the treatment of certain patients for longer durations and are looking for additional treatment options or approaches. I am looking forward to new data being presented at ACC.17 that could help guide physicians in the choices they make for these patients.”

Professor Jeffrey Weitz, Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada


Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer
Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer

“For Bayer, ACC.17 is a great opportunity to highlight our continued commitment to the field of cardiology, as well as our ongoing clinical trial programme that strives to optimise patient care. We look forward to the scientific exchange and to hear about the latest clinical updates from the various experts in the field.”

Dr Jörg Möller, Member of the Executive Committee of Bayer AG's Pharmaceutical Division and Head of Development, Bayer


Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cardiovascular disease worldwide and is the most common avoidable cause of hospital death. VTE encompasses two conditions: deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is a blood clot that forms in the veins that lie deep within the muscles, for example in the leg or pelvis. If all or part of the DVT breaks off and the blood clot moves to block a vessel in the lungs, this is known as a PE, an event which can be rapidly fatal.